Since my first tool video I did a few years back, I’ve had so many people ask me for a more condensed list of tools that I would consider as the essentials for an apprentice to buy. This list is ONLY hand tools - not power tools like drills and saws. Here’s my top 13 list.

#1 - LINEMAN’S PLIERS

Every electrician, no-matter where they’re at in their career, must have a set of lineman’s pliers. There are several brands and styles out there to use, and I think I’ve got at least one of all of them. The one’s I have the easiest access to, that have been reliable my whole career, have been Klein’s. I’ve tried several different models of Klein lineman’s pliers, and there are definitely a few I like more than others. The high-leverage set are great for having torque and power behind the tool. The smaller multi-tool lineman’s offer a little more versatility since they have strippers, bolt cutters, and the front is shaped like a standard lineman’s pliers - but they don’t offer the same power with the shorter handles. Either way you go, you need a set of lineman’s pliers if you’re getting into the electrical trade.

#2 - NEEDLE-NOSE PLIERS

The needle-nose pliers is our next “must-have” as an electrician. We use these in so many ways, and for so many reasons so having one near-by is always a good idea. There are times we need to get in to really tight spaces to grab things, or we need to bend the ends of conductors to fit into a termination. Some needle-nose pliers come with a stripping hole, or some yet come with an entire set of different gauged-holes for stripping various sizes of wires. Either way you go, you need one of these beasts and will probably use it on a daily basis.

#3 - DIAGONAL-CUTTING PLIERS

Having a good set of diagonal-cutting pliers in your pouch is a no-brainer as an electrician. We cut things, a lot, and having a tool specifically being able to cut at the tip of the tool, or use it to pry is an extremely handy thing to be able to do. A lot of times we need to cut things in tight spaces, or we just need to grab something and pry on it it. These do both. Many electricians have holes in theirs from cutting live wires and not paying attention to the fact the tool is grounded out. This is an expensive mistake to make, but we’ve all done it. Just try not to, but definitely get a set of these.

#4 - WIRE-STRIPPERS

Another obvious tool electricians use all day, every day, is the wire-stripper. There are MANY different types, brands, and models of wire-stripping tools on the market and while some of them are trash, many of them are great - and cheap. I like having a couple of different pairs on me at all times, because some of them have features that the others don’t. For example one of my pairs has longer handles, bolt cutters, stripping holes, and several different crimping jaws. I don’t use this as a stripper, but all of the other functions on it I do use on a regular basis. I tend to keep a smaller, more compact version on me as well - this one just for stripping and cutting. Either way you go, get a set - and in the US I recommend getting one that will strip 10 guage down to 16 guage wire. If you could find one that would go from 6 to 24 guage that would be amazing, but I have yet to find one that does this. It would be impractical, I feel, but who knows…maybe some day somebody will make one.

#5 - CHANNEL-LOCKS

I have several sets of channel-locks, and several sizes as well. I’m a firm believer that you need to have 2 sets of whatever you buy. Most of the time we use these to clamp onto something, while twisting something else on or off - such as couplings, connectors, and lock-rings. I debated throwing a pipe wrench (or monkey wrench) into this list as well, for the same reason, but that’s really more of an “extra” tool to have if you want to have an ace up your sleeve. For most of our work, a couple sets of channel locks will do just fine. I suggest getting 2 pairs of 11-inch, and 2 pairs of 14-inch channels. This gets you through most of the conduit sizes we deal with from day to day.

CONTINUE READING FULL ARTICLE AT: https://www.electricianu.com/podcast/episode-42-apprentice-tools-13-tools-apprentice-electricians-need-to-have-tare8

#apprentice #electrician #tools

Since my first tool video I did a few years back, I’ve had so many people ask me for a more condensed list of tools that I would consider as the essentials for an apprentice to buy. This list is ONLY hand tools – not power tools like drills and saws. Here’s my top 13 list.

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#1 – LINEMAN’S PLIERS

Every electrician, no-matter where they’re at in their career, must have a set of lineman’s pliers. There are several brands and styles out there to use, and I think I’ve got at least one of all of them. The one’s I have the easiest access to, that have been reliable my whole career, have been Klein’s. I’ve tried several different models of Klein lineman’s pliers, and there are definitely a few I like more than others. The high-leverage set are great for having torque and power behind the tool. The smaller multi-tool lineman’s offer a little more versatility since they have strippers, bolt cutters, and the front is shaped like a standard lineman’s pliers – but they don’t offer the same power with the shorter handles. Either way you go, you need a set of lineman’s pliers if you’re getting into the electrical trade.

#2 – NEEDLE-NOSE PLIERS

The needle-nose pliers is our next “must-have” as an electrician. We use these in so many ways, and for so many reasons so having one near-by is always a good idea. There are times we need to get in to really tight spaces to grab things, or we need to bend the ends of conductors to fit into a termination. Some needle-nose pliers come with a stripping hole, or some yet come with an entire set of different gauged-holes for stripping various sizes of wires. Either way you go, you need one of these beasts and will probably use it on a daily basis.

#3 – DIAGONAL-CUTTING PLIERS

Having a good set of diagonal-cutting pliers in your pouch is a no-brainer as an electrician. We cut things, a lot, and having a tool specifically being able to cut at the tip of the tool, or use it to pry is an extremely handy thing to be able to do. A lot of times we need to cut things in tight spaces, or we just need to grab something and pry on it it. These do both. Many electricians have holes in theirs from cutting live wires and not paying attention to the fact the tool is grounded out. This is an expensive mistake to make, but we’ve all done it. Just try not to, but definitely get a set of these.

#4 – WIRE-STRIPPERS

Another obvious tool electricians use all day, every day, is the wire-stripper. There are MANY different types, brands, and models of wire-stripping tools on the market and while some of them are trash, many of them are great – and cheap. I like having a couple of different pairs on me at all times, because some of them have features that the others don’t. For example one of my pairs has longer handles, bolt cutters, stripping holes, and several different crimping jaws. I don’t use this as a stripper, but all of the other functions on it I do use on a regular basis. I tend to keep a smaller, more compact version on me as well – this one just for stripping and cutting. Either way you go, get a set – and in the US I recommend getting one that will strip 10 guage down to 16 guage wire. If you could find one that would go from 6 to 24 guage that would be amazing, but I have yet to find one that does this. It would be impractical, I feel, but who knows…maybe some day somebody will make one.

#5 – CHANNEL-LOCKS

I have several sets of channel-locks, and several sizes as well. I’m a firm believer that you need to have 2 sets of whatever you buy. Most of the time we use these to clamp onto something, while twisting something else on or off – such as couplings, connectors, and lock-rings. I debated throwing a pipe wrench (or monkey wrench) into this list as well, for the same reason, but that’s really more of an “extra” tool to have if you want to have an ace up your sleeve. For most of our work, a couple sets of channel locks will do just fine. I suggest getting 2 pairs of 11-inch, and 2 pairs of 14-inch channels. This gets you through most of the conduit sizes we deal with from day to day.

CONTINUE READING FULL ARTICLE AT: https://www.electricianu.com/podcast/episode-42-apprentice-tools-13-tools-apprentice-electricians-need-to-have-tare8

#apprentice #electrician #tools

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You find that we are a full service heating and air conditioning service provider in Madera County serving Fresno, Bass Lake, Mariposa, Coarsegold, Oakhurst and surrounding areas. We work on:
Trane Furnace Repair
American Standard Furnace Repair
Goodman Furnace Repair
Janitrol Furnace Repair
Rheem Furnace Repair
RUUD Furnace Repair
Lennox Furnace Repair
Comfortmaker Furnace Repair
Heil Furnace Repair
Tempstar Furnace Repair
Amana Furnace Repair
Maytag Furnace Repair
Nordyne Furnace Repair
Intertherm Furnace Repair
Coleman Furnace Repair
Armstrong Furnace Repair
Carrier Furnace repair
Day and Night Furnace Repair
Payne Furnace Repair
Consolidated Industries Furnace Repair
Premier Furnace Repair
And more. We work on hot surface ignition systems, floor furnaces, wall furnaces, garage heating systems, mini-split ductless systems. We repair central heating and air conditioning systems including:
Trane Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
American Standard Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Goodman Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Janitrol Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Rheem Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
RUUD Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Lennox Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Comfortmaker Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Heil Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Tempstar Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Amana Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Maytag Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Nordyne Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Intertherm Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Coleman Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Armstrong Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Carrier Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Day and Night Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Payne Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Consolidated Industries Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation
Premier Heating and Air Conditioning Repair and Installation

Most heating repairs are less than $100. We are your furnace repair experts. Heat pumps repaired and Freon leaks fixed.
* Trane Furnace Repair
* American Standard Furnace Repair
* Carrier Furnace Repair
* Payne Furnace Repair
* Bryant Furnace Repair
* Goodman Furnace Repair
* Janitrol Furnace Repair
* Amana Furnace Repair
* Wall Furnace Repair
* Floor Furnace Repair
We repair and install all brands of home and commercial furnaces and air conditioners.
Visit our website at http://www.EmpireCares.com/ and download valuable coupons. Yelp Empire Reviews Yelp. For more information see one of our many websites at http://www.coarsegoldheating.com/ or http://www.oakhurstheating.com/ or http://www.empirecares.com/ Empire plumbing reviews. Empire air conditioning reviews. Empire heating reviews. Empire electric reviews.

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First part of the Project.

Project: Installation of Two High Efficient Triangle Tube boilers and four 120 Gallon Glass-Lined Storage Tanks with dielectric unions and piping between boilers and tanks on the roof of a 25floor building.

Contractor: Milani Plumbing, Drainage & Heating.

For service please contact: 604-888-8888

Plumbing in Vancouver


phone: (604) 888-8888

Installing the Harman PB105 Pellet Boiler. Video 1 of a few taken on that day.
I designed and built my 3-story 3-car #garage by myself from foundation to siding in only a few months. I took videos and timelapse of the entire project from start to finish.

Subscribe and watch the whole video series to see how it did it! – http://goo.gl/z5P38R

Even more information @ http://mygaragebuild.com

Videos shot with the:
GoPro3 – http://amzn.to/1PY4m5Y and GoPro2 – http://amzn.to/1PY02Uo and Joby Tripod – http://amzn.to/1OcrNpN

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Check out my channel trailer! All my coolest shots – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzMlIzuvuIg
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This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey replaces a water heater and boiler with a single unit that’s much more efficient. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)
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Shopping List for How to Install a Combination Boiler/Water Heater:
– Plywood panel, used for mounting new combination boiler[BR]
– Combination boiler/water heater, including mounting hardware
– PVC pipe and fittings
– Outdoor temperature sensor
– PVC condensate line with limestone neutralizer
– Condensate pump
 
Tools List for How to Install a Combination Boiler/Water Heater:
– Screwdriver
– Drill/driver with 4-inch hole saw
– Tape measure

Steps for How to Install a Combination Boiler/Water Heater:
1. Mount a plywood panel to the basement wall to serve as a mounting panel for the new combination boiler.
2. Run new gas, electrical, and plumbing lines to the plywood panel.
3. Screw the metal mounting brackets to the plywood panel, then hang the combination heater onto the brackets.
4. Drill two 4-inch-diameter holes through the house wall for the exhaust vent and air intake vent. Be sure the air intake is above the snow line, and that the exhaust vent is 12 inches from a window and 12 inches from the air intake.
5. Use PVC pipe and fittings to create the exhaust and air intake vents. Run the piping from the boiler through the exterior wall.
6. Connect hot- and cold-water lines to the combination boiler to deliver water to the heating system and the domestic water fixtures.
7. Connect the gas line and new electrical cable to the combination boiler.
8. Mount an outdoor temperature sensor onto the north side of the house to help regulate the production of hot water.
9. Run a PVC condensate line with limestone neutralizer from the combination heater to a nearby utility sink drain or floor drain. Use a condensate pump to drain away the excess condensation.
10. Turn on the combination boiler, and it should immediately start making hot water.
11. Remove and discard the old boiler and water heater.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we’re ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Install a Combination Boiler/Water Heater | Ask This Old House
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First job was to construct a hearth for the boiler at the new floor height. It was a bit of a design as you go process but we got there in the end, even if only just 8 hours before install.

Check out our blog for more info and photos

http://www.restorationcouple.com/2015/04/09/biomass-boiler-installation-building-the-hearth/